Growing up ñ Mashup: Family

In December 2014, Project ñ joined Bianca at her college graduation commencement ceremony with Metropolitan State University of Denver as she received a diploma for Entrepreneurial Studies and Spanish Language. Dominguez finds herself torn between the Mexican side of her family that supports her and pushes her to do her best, and the American culture that at times rejects her by underestimating her but also encourages her to be more independent. Related Links: Metropolitan State University of Denver, Journey Through Our Heritage, Denver School of the Arts

Irene Arguelles was born in east Los Angeles. Her parents were both born in Mexico and arrived in the US as youth themselves. Growing up,  Irene remembers her mother being a strong, hard women where as her father was warmer. Tension between her and her family began when she chose to attend school out of state. While Irene saw this as ‘opportunity,’ her family saw this as her moving away from her culture  and this made them angry.

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Growing up ñ Mashups: Language

Born in the US and raised in a traditional Mexican household speaking Spanish, Guadalupe didn’t speak English until kindergarten and was considered a foreigner. To this day, she finds nothing more fulfilling than helping translate for people because she hated it when she was that person that people didn’t understand. (2:46)

Charles is co-owner and partner of Wigwam Creative. Based in Denver, Colorado with his wife and three daughters, Charles is an entrepreneur and powerhouse creative director.  Charles is an ñ although he was raised by his father in Washington state, his mother is from El Salvador.  Charles recalls feeling different, being American and yet Latino. Without his mother’s culture present in his childhood, he speaks of his El Salvadoran “other side” as a hidden and mysterious part of his identity.

Do you know an ñ with an amazing story? Tweet at us using #soyñ AND #beingñ so we can connect with you! Or join our private Facebook group and connect with other ñs or share your story!

Are you an ñ? Stand up and be counted! Go to our interactive ñ map!

Thanks for watching!

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